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Dundas Delsey Pond Water Drainage for Species at Risk Relocation

By on July 27, 2022 0
Crews were on site Wednesday, July 20, apparently slowly draining water from Delsey Pond to help find and remove any species at risk in the pond before dredging begins.
  • Crews were on site Wednesday, July 20, apparently slowly draining water from Delsey Pond to help find and remove any species at risk in the pond before dredging begins.

City contractors drained water from Delsey Pond this week in conjunction with moving wildlife from the pond before resuming dredging.

City of Hamilton spokesman Norm Miller said on July 22 crews were on site to complete work to relocate species at risk.

“To facilitate this work, pumps have been installed to gradually dewater the stormwater management facility,” Miller said.

He said dewatering pumping rates were being coordinated with a biologist on site to avoid “negative impacts” on wildlife as the search for endangered species is completed.

“There is an excavator on site, but not (to carry out) any dredging until the wildlife work is complete and the site is cleared for the next phase of work,” said Miller. “We expect the wildlife work to be completed in about two weeks.”

This would apparently put the start of dredging at the week of August 2.

“During this period, temporary wildlife fencing will be erected and inspected daily based on recommendations from the Royal Botanic Gardens to limit the re-entry of wildlife into the facility during dredging operations,” Miller said.

Crews were on site Wednesday morning, July 20, using equipment from United Rentals to apparently remove water from the pond.

Ted Grace and Rob Halsey of United Rentals did not respond to timely requests for information about the machines used and what they do.

Local residents and environmental experts have expressed concerns about the resumption of dredging, particularly as the department continues to study the impacts of 2021 dredging on species and habitat at risk.

Department of Environment, Conservation and Parks spokesman Gary Wheeler said he encourages the city to share information with the public, but the city’s last proactive public update was in July 7, when she announced plans to resume dredging the week of July 25, after Fish and Wildlife. moving the week of July 18.

A permit from the ministry requires the city to retain the services of a “qualified professional” to carry out a “mussel reclamation and relocation program”, and the ministry will monitor the work to ensure that the requirements and conditions of the permit are fulfilled.

Wheeler said the department will conduct “random, unannounced site visits to verify that health or safety permit conditions are being met.”

Ministry staff could not say before the deadline whether any site visits or inspections had taken place between July 7 and July 22, or whether the city had met all permit conditions so far.

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